10 Best Pubs in Edinburgh, Scotland

Edinburgh is a city known for its pubs and nightlife. Known for century-old and wooden paneled watering holes, there is something for everyone. So whether you’re a fan of beers, wine or cocktails, this list of best pubs in Edinburgh has you covered. 

10 Best Pubs in Edinburgh, Scotland

1. The Royal Oak

The Royal Oak

Celebrating good traditional music with a fine selection of whiskeys and ales is The Royal Oak. The 200-year-old pub is home to one of Scotland’s greatest live folk music sessions, with regular performers such as Kris Drever and Karine Polwart, to name a few.

Their varied selection of whiskeys, ales, and Guinness are managed by expert staffs who will happily help you on choosing or suggesting a drink that you might like. You might chance upon old locals singing to one of the best folk music around town—do not hesitate to join them, as you enjoy your time in one of Edinburgh’s popular pubs.

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 1:00 PM to 2:00 AM

Friday – Saturday – 11:30AM to 2:00 AM

Sunday- 1:00 PM to 2:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: 1 Infirmary Street, Edinburgh

Phone: +441315572976

2. Sandy Bell’s

sandy bell’s

This small, but warm and homely bar is home to the local’s great music sessions. And the best thing? You can even bring your pets with you! Just make sure they don’t make a mess on the carpet.

Wide selections of whiskeys and beers include Speyside, Lowland, and Islay malts—in addition to their English, Indian and Japanese whiskeys. If you are not yet ready for a drink, you can also try some of their homemade ale pies, crisp toasted sandwiches, and hearty bowls of soup.

They also have Irish traditional music sessions every night.

Opening Hours

Monday to Saturday – 12:00 PM to 1:00 AM

Sunday- 12:30 PM to 12:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: 25 Forrest Road Edinburgh, EH1 2QH

Phone: 0131 225 2751

3. Whiski Bar & Restaurant, Edinburgh

 

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Serving so much more than plain old whiskey, the Whiski Bar and Restaurant offers a great menu for meat-lovers and vegetarians alike. Dubbed as Edinburgh’s ‘leading Scottish bar and restaurant’, the multi-award-winning bar is home to a selection of over 300 Scotch malt whiskeys, and a myriad selection of fresh cocktails.

Free and live Scottish music is available weekly, all-year-round. The bar also boasts a restaurant that offers breakfast and a la carte menus that range from tasty starters, Scottish steaks, salads with their choice goat’s cheese, haggis, Scottish-steak burgers, and much more—they also offer kiddie meals for children up to the age of 10.

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 11:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Friday to Sunday – 10:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: 119 High Street, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, EH1 1SG

Phone: +44 131 556 3095

4. Bennets Bar

Bennets Bar

The historic pub is a lovely and warm mix of dark woods and medieval lighting. The pub is small, but its features and traditional-spirited character shows in every bit of detail on its fixtures and Victorian-themed furniture.

With a selection of over 150 whiskeys and ales on their gantries—this small pub has much more spirits to offer than one could imagine. Its snug and Victorian atmosphere will surely make you feel the nuances of the culture of Edinburgh. 

Opening Hours

Monday to Sunday – 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Contact Information

Address: 8 Leven StreetEdinburgh EH3 9LG, Scotland

Phone: +44 131 229 5143

5. Port O’ Leith

Port O’ Leith

Located in the heart of Edinburgh is Port O’ Leith. The pub, in all sense of the word, was once the port-of-call for seafarers near Edinburgh—hence, the sailing, nautical, and sea-inspired memorabilia found in its interiors.

With its old-fashioned fixtures, you will find yourself transported to a genuine sailor’s pub. You will learn more of its history if ever you would strike a conversation with the tough, but gentle-hearted locals found in the pub. Strong and varied whiskeys, ales, and beers are available upon request from their friendly bartenders and staff.

Opening Hours

Monday to Sunday – 12:00 PM to 1:00 AM

Contact Information

Address:  58 Constitution St, EH6 6RS

Phone: +44 131 555 5503

6. The Oxford Bar, Edinburgh

With its key-feature of having a literary tour of the British writers who have frequented in this pub, notably the writer of the Rebus novels, The Oxford Bar is a classy and yet simple pub for both locals and tourists.

With their good selection of whiskeys and ales on their fashioned gantries, and highly-conversant and friendly folks, the Oxford Bar is a must-visit.

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 12:00 PM to 12:00 AM

Friday to Saturday-  11:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Sunday – 12:30 PM to 11:00 PM

Contact Information

Address:  8 Young Street, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH2 4JB

Phone: 0131 539 7119

7. Kay’s Bar

Kay’s Bar

Unique to this warm and cozy bar is its rich Victorian style, enough for any local or tourist to have photos on its picturesque exterior. The Kay’s Bar is noteworthy not only for its ales but also for its small and snug library. A feature for literary and introvert types of whiskey-goers.

Their fine and diverse selection of real ales, whiskeys, and wines will keep you and your friends entertained while enjoying the great décor and history found exclusively in this historic bar. 

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Friday to Saturday-  11:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Sunday – 12:30 PM to 11:00 PM

Contact Information

Address: 39 Jamaica Street, Edinburgh

Phone: +441312251858

8. Greyfriars Bobby’s Bar and Restaurant

Greyfriars Bobby’s Bar and Restaurant

This bar and restaurant found in the heart of Edinburgh is one of the best places to relax and enjoy quality food and drinks with friends or family. With their highly-affordable meal options, the bar and restaurant boast of delectable comfort foods for meat-lovers, haggis-fanatics, and vegetarians alike.

Ales and whiskey of choice are of top quality as well. If you aim to unwind for this week, then a stop at Greyfriars Bobby’s Bar and Restaurant is recommended. 

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Friday to Saturday- 10:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Sunday – 11:00 AM to 12:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: 30-34 Candlemaker Row, Old Town, Edinburgh EH1 2QE

Phone: +44-131-2258328

9. The Sheep Heid Inn Pub & Restaurant, Edinburgh

The Sheep Heid Inn Pub & Restaurant

Dating back since 1390, this historic pub has been serving ales, whiskeys, and good accommodation for 600 years, and is rightly claimed as the oldest pub in Scotland. Their restored pub has its own courtyard, where graduations and other booked special events can be celebrated.

Past monarchs, poets, and literary figures have frequented this historic pub. Enjoy not only their fine-tasting whiskeys and ales but also their classic menu choices from spirit-roasted chicken to Margherita pizzas, delectable lavash vegetable flatbreads, to their apple and rhubarb crumble. 

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 11:00 AM to 11:00 PM

Friday to Saturday- 11:00 AM to 12:00 AM

Sunday – 12:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Contact Information

Address: Duddingston, Edinburgh, EH15 3QA.

Phone:+44 (0) 131 661 7974

10. The White Hart Inn

The White Hart Inn

Stemming from its great history, the White Hart Inn serves some of the best whiskeys and ales in Edinburgh. With their cold beers, fine-tasting malt whiskeys, warm and hearty pies, and traditional interiors, the pub will surely warm you from the chilly weather of Edinburgh.

Established since 1516, this historic pub is a great representation of the unique and rich culture that Edinburgh, Scotland has to offer. 

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday – 11:00 AM to 12:00 AM

Friday to Saturday- 11:00 AM to 1:00 AM

Sunday – 11:00 AM to 12:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: 34 Grassmarket, Edinburgh, Midlothian, EH112PE

Phone: 0044 131 2262806

Email: Whitehart.edinburgh@belhavenpubs.net

10 Things To Do in the Isle of Mull, Scotland

The Isle of Mull is just one of the nearly 800 islands off the coast of Scotland and is one of the largest. Its diverse landscape which is a good mix of ancient remnants, imposing castles and forts, rich natural wonders and pretty townscapes gives every type of visitor something to do and so much to see. It’s also close to other fascinating islands and a quick boat trip to any of those is a must while you’re in Mull. Here’s a list of things to do in the Isle of Mull to help you figure out where to go and what to do while in this lovely Scottish island.

10 Things To Do in the Isle of Mull

1. Duart Castle

Duart Castle

The stunning Duart Castle was built around the 13th century and was the seat of the Maclean clan. It was eventually abandoned in 1751, then in the early y 1900s, it was bought and restored d to the castle that we see today.

It is now open to the public for tours and is one of the best attractions in the Isle of Mull. A must visit in the palace is the tea room, which ch uses ingredients sourced from the palace gardens. Duart Castle and its surrounding area has been a location for films, and can also be hired as a wedding venue.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 10:30 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

Adult £7.50
Child (5-15yrs) £4.00
Family (2 adults + 2 children (5-15yrs)) £19.00
Seniors and students

Contact Information

Address: Duart Castle, Isle of Mull, Scotland, PA64 6AP

Phone:  +44(0)1680 812309

Email: guide@duartcastle.com

2. Hike up the Ben More

Aside from the Isle of Skye, the only other Munro (or mountain that’s over 3,000 feet high) in a Scottish island is the Ben More. Also known as ‘the roof of Mull’, Ben More is 966 meters (3,169 ft) high and provides panoramic views of the many islands surrounding the area. One of the best things to do in Isle of Mull on weekends is to climb up Ben More, which can be pretty challenging depending on which trail you take.

For advanced hikers with good navigation skills, there’s a trail via the A’ Chioch ridge and Beinn Fhada which is steep and rocky and takes about 8 to 9 hours to complete. There’s also a relatively easier, more straightforward route from Dhiseig which takes about 5 to 7 hours. Both can be exhausting, but well worth it as the views from the top are quite unforgettable.

3. Lochbuie Stone Circle

Lochbuie Stone Circle

This is a must-visit if you’re into archeology and ancient history, or simply curious what these stone circles are. Lochbuie Stone Circle is one of the best places to visit in the Isle of Mull if you’re interested to see remnants of prehistoric activity. The Stone Circle in Lochbuie is composed of a series of standing stones that date back to the Bronze Age. Along with ancient cairns and cists that can be found in other parts of Mull, the Stone Circles are among the most visited attractions in Mull. Places and monuments like these are a great opportunity to get started on any city or town’s history, and should always be included when checking out what a certain place has to offer.

Contact Information

Address: Lochbuie House, Lochbuie, Isle of Mull, PA62 6AA

Phone: 01680 814214

Email: patience.corbett@talk21.com

4. Wildlife Watching

The Isle of Mull abounds with wildlife, and it is everywhere. From mountains to lowlands to the waters surrounding it, there’s always something to see. Mull is known all over as one of the best places to go to in the UK if you want nr to see otters and white-tailed eagles. Both of these fascinating creatures can be found without much effort: you simply have to sit and wait by the coast then watch them appear.

There are lots of other species that you’ll come across with while in the Isle of Mull but it is suggested to join hiking or boat tours for you to fully enjoy the experience. Wildlife spotting is also considered as one of the best things to do in the Isle of Mull so make sure to set aside de some time for this activity.

5. Stargazing & Astro-photography

Stargazing and astrophotography are becoming increasingly popular lately, but there’s not enough place to do it as most areas are filled with light pollution. The presence of other sources or even mere particles of light makes it difficult to capture a clear image of the night sky.

In the Isle of Mull, however, there’s an unobstructed view of the starry sky. The sky is clear and devoid of any light pollution, that taking photos won’t have you adjusting and trying a hundred different camera settings.

Most times, you simply have to find an angle you like and hit capture. In Isle, if Mull, there are groups that offer stargazing and astrophotography activities, and its best to join one as you can even learn new things about taking that perfect starry night photo.

This is definitely one of the best things to do in the Isle of Mull during the night and if you’re luckier and there’s been a higher solar activity, you may even see the elusive aurora borealis.

6. Tobermory

Tobermory

Tobermory is Isle of Mull’s main town and is easily recognizable by those who have seen the children’s TV series Balamory. This picturesque small town mesmerizes the moment your boat from Kilchoan arrives. As it docks on Tobermory, you’ll be greeted by colorfully painted houses lining the waterfront area. Despite its small size, this town has plenty to offer apart from the usual restaurants, cafes, and accommodations. There’s the Aros Park, the Mull Aquarium, the Tobermory Distillery, Loch Sunart, Calve Island and the Mull Museum.

Opening Hours

7:00 AM -10:00 PM (Sunday opens 12:30pm)

Admission Fee

Free

Contact Information

Address:Mull Museum Main Street Clumba Buildings PA75 6NY Tobermory Scotland

Phone: +44 1688 302208

7. Tobermory Distillery

Tobermory Distillery

The Tobermory Distillery was originally called Ledaig and had quite a turbulent history since it was established. It closed a number of times, but for the past few decades has been going strong.

Like most distilleries, the Tobermory Distillery offers tours to guests and is one of the main points of interest in the Isle of Mull. It is centrally located and is the original and only distillery in Mull. It is also one of the oldest distilleries in Scotland.

They take pride in their two variants of single malt whiskey, each with a distinct character. There’s the Tobermory which is fruity and unpeated, and the Ledaig which is uniquely robust and smoky.

The distillery is open all year round to visitors and they’d y gladly show you how they produce their whiskey with the emphasis on the distinct drams that they distill.

Opening Hour

Monday to Sunday – 10: AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

Tobermory Classic Tour: £10 per ticket

Tobermory Tour: £8 per ticket

Tour Tastings: £20 per ticket

Whiskey and Chocolate Experience: £25 per ticket

Contact Information

Address: Tobermory, Isle of Mull, PA75 6NR

Phone: 1688 302647

Email: info@tobermorydistillery.com

8. Iona

Iona

Iona is a completely different and separate island, but to get here, you’d have to go through the Isle of Mull first. Unless you have your own boat, then there’s no other way to reach Iona than through Mull, which further adds to its mystique. A trip to Iona is definitely one of the best things to do in the Isle of Mull. Iona is home to the Abbey, which is the burial place of the many kings of Scotland as well as royalty from other nations.

Located off the southwest of the Isle of Mull, Iona had quite a role in Scottish history as it was the center of Christianity during the medieval era. Aside from the burial site, you can also visit the Benedictine Abbey church in Iona, the Augustinian nunnery, and the Heritage Center. Visit one of the cafes and have a bowl of hearty soup, then enjoy a stroll along the shores of this scenic island.

Opening Hour

1 Apr to 30 Sept:
Daily, 9:30 am to 5:30 pm
Last entry 5:00 pm

1 Oct to 31 Mar:
Mon-Sat, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm
Sun: Only the Abbey Church, Michael Chapel, Shrine and grounds are open
Last entry 3:30 pm

Admission Fee

Member/Explorer Pass holder: FREE
Adult: £9.00
Child aged 5–15: £5.40
Child under 5: FREE
Concession: £7.20

Contact Information

Address: Isle Of Iona, Argyll,PA76 6SQ

Phone: +44 (1681) 700 512

Email: customer@hes.scot

9. Eas Fors Waterfall

Located in the nearby Isle of Ulva is a stunning waterfall with a strange name. Eas and Fors are Gaelic and Old Norse respectively, and both means waterfall.

Saying this name sounds like an incantation of some sort, but the place is magical and you just forget that you literally had to say ‘waterfall ‘ three times. Eas Fors is fed by rainfall into a river that passes under a road before it reaches the sea.

The waterfall in itself is already a sight to behold, but there is something about watching the waters journeying into a bigger space. It’s just a 30-minute walk but it’s quite fascinating to watch, just mind your steps because it can be slippery and there is a lot of water rushing into the sea.

10. Glengorm Castle

Glengorm Castle

Glengorm Castle is also known as Castle Sorm, a fairytale-like structure that was built in the late 19th century. It overlooks the Atlantic ocean and offers unparalleled views of nearby islands such as Canna, Rum, and Uist. The castle is situated at the Glengorm headland and surrounded by coastline, forestry, hills, and lochs. The castle is a functioning hotel, though, and not really open for public tours but you can always stroll along with the vast estate, take photos as the castle provides a scenic backdrop or visit its coffeeshop. Explore the castle grounds and you might just stumble upon on a path that’ll lead you to the nearby Dum Ara Castle.

Opening Hour

Friday – 12:00 AM 6:00 PM

9:00 Pm to 12:00 AM

Contact Information

Address: Tobermory,Argyll, PA75 6QE

Phone: +44 (1688) 302321

Email: enquiries@glengormcastle.co.uk


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10 Things To Do in the Isle of Mull, Scotland

10 Must-See Castles In Edinburgh (And The Surrounding Areas)

An old city that’s known for its historic districts, interesting landscape, an assortment of architectural wonders reflected in its many attractions – Edinburgh doesn’t disappoint. Home to one of the most recognizable and picturesque castles in the world, this city is more than just that castle on a rock. There’s at least a couple more within the city and more in the surrounding areas, all within easy access by bus train or bike. Consider this list of best castles in Edinburgh, within and around the city that you simply must visit. Each with a distinct personality but all equally stunning.

10 Must-See Castles In Edinburgh (And The Surrounding Areas)

1. Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle Scotland

Situated on one end of the Royal Mile and perched dramatically on a rock is the Edinburgh Castle. Regarded as one of the most popular castles in Scotland, this one was built in the 12th century where a fortress once stood since the Iron Age. Hike up the castle rock, cycle or drive up to a certain spot, and spend a day exploring as there’s a lot to see here.

Managed by Historic Scotland, the castle is crammed with museums and exhibits. Be sure to check out the elaborate Great Hall, the Stone of Destiny, and the Crown Jewels. The castle also offers the best views over Edinburgh where you get to see most of its other attractions so make sure you bring a camera as you plan where to go next. The castle is also one of the top things to do in Edinburgh.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM

Admission Fee

Ticket type Gate price Online price
Adult (16-59yrs) £19.50 £17.50
Concession (60yrs+ and unemployed)* £16.00 £14.00
Child (5-15yrs) £11.50 £10.50

Contact Information

Address:

Castle Hill,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH1 2NG

Phone: +44 (131) 225 9846

Email: customer@hes.scot

2. Palace of Holyroodhouse

Holyroodhouse Castle Edinburgh

Located within a short walking distance from the city center is the luxurious Palace of Holyroodhouse. It is the official residence of the queen in Scotland and opens to the public all year round. It is known for its elaborate rooms which you should check out when you visit, particularly the King’s bedchamber and Mary Queen of Scots’ Chamber.

Holyroodhouse is situated at the very end of the Royal Mile and is a must-visit not just for hours but days because there’s plenty to see. It also has a beautiful garden where you can relax after exploring Holyroodhouse and nearby is another must-see, the 12th-century Holyrood Abbey.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM

Admission Fee

Palace of Holyroodhouse Royal Visit*
Over 60/ student £13.50 £22.00
Under 17 / Disabled £8.70 £14.70
Under 5 Free Free
Family (2 adults and 3 under 17s) £38.70 £63.70

Contact Information

Address:

Palace of Holyroodhouse,
Canongate, Royal Mile,
Edinburgh,
Lothian,
EH8 8DX

Phone: +44 (0)303 123 7306

Email: bookinginfo@rct.uk

3. Craigmillar Castle

craigmillar castle

Located in a less touristy area which can be reached via a 20-minute bus ride from the city center, Craigmillar is often referred to as the ‘other Edinburgh Castle’. This structure gives visitors an insight into how Scotland castles developed over the centuries. Built in the 14th century, the castle has a dominant stone tower house. Over the centuries, parts were either added or renovated. Craigmillar Castle was once home to the prominent Preston family, has links to Mary Queen of Scots and has an intriguing history. Certain parts of the castle are sadly in ruins, but it remains to be one of the best-preserved Medieval Castles in Scotland and definitely worth a visit.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Member/Explorer Pass holder: FREE
Adult: £6.00
Concession: £4.80
Child aged 5-15: £3.60
Child under 5: FREE

Contact Information

Address:

Craigmillar Castle Road,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH16 4SY

Phone: +44 (131) 661 4445

Email:  customer@hes.scot

4. Crichton Castle

Crichton Castle

Located just 15 miles from Edinburgh’s city center is the somewhat desolate Crichton Castle. It was founded in the 1400s and originally belonged to the powerful Crichton family before it was turned over to the even more prominent Bothwell. The 4th Earl of Bothwell was the husband of Mary Queen of Scots, although it was a doomed marriage which soon led to the queen’s downfall.

With that bit of history associated with Crichton Castle, the structure is even located in a seemingly remote countryside. It looks even lovelier from the road and often compared to the Hermitage Castle, but it’s still a favorite location for cyclists, hikers and horseback riders as ita quite scenic and quiet.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Member/Explorer Pass holder: FREE
Adult: £6.00
Concession: £4.80
Child aged 5-15: £3.60
Child under 5: FREE

Contact Information

Address: 

Crichton,
Pathhead,
Midlothian,
EH37 5XA

Phone: +44 (1875) 320017

Email:  customer@hes.scot

5. Blackness Castle

Blackness Castle

Situated on the banks of River Forth, Blackness Castle looks dark and imposing at first glance. This castle was built in the15th century and was a former residence of the Crichton family, that became a state prison for a time and eventually an artillery depot. Blackness Castle is also called by locals as ‘the ship that never sailed’, because of its strange shape that’s best seen from above.

Like most castles, Blackness has also survived brutal sieges and at present draws tourists because of it becoming a filming location for ‘Outlander’ and ‘Mary, Queen of Scots’.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Member/Explorer Pass holder: FREE
Adult: £6.00
Concession: £4.80
Child aged 5-15: £3.60
Child under 5: FREE

Contact Information

Address:

Blackness,
Linlithgow,
EH49 7NH

Phone: +44 (1506) 834807

Email:  customer@hes.scot

6. Tantallon Castle

Tantallon Castle

Dramatically resting on a hilltop is another must-visit near Edinburgh, the Tantallon Castle. Built in the 1400s, the castle has endured sieges and wars, and regarded by Historic Scotland as ‘ the last truly great castle built in Scotland’. This castle belongs to the Douglas family and has gone through renovations over the past centuries. Tantallon is also located near Seacliff beach, which offers a stunning perspective of the castle from the waters.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Adult £ 6.00,

Child £ 3.60,

Senior £ 4.80

Contact Information

Address:

North Berwick,
East Lothian,
EH39 5PN

Phone: +44 (1620) 892 727

Email:  customer@hes.scot

7. Lauriston Castle

Lauriston Castle

Set inside a public park and free to visit, the pretty  Lauriston Castle has eclectic collections and quirky displays. The castle was built during the 15th century and has undergone many renovations since, where buildings were added and expansions were made.  Presently located inside a public park, Lauriston is best experienced with a guided tour and a visit to the nearby shoreline to enjoy some quiet time. Another thing you should check out from the castle grounds is the Tidal Island of Cramond.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM

Admission Fee

Adult: £5 (2pm tour); £8 (out of hours)
Concessions: £3 (2pm tour); £5 (out of hours)
Family (up to two adults and three children under 16): £12.50 (2pm tour)
Group (10+): £3 (2pm tour)

Contact Information

Address:

Lauriston Castle Edinburgh,
2a Cramond Road South,
Edinburgh,
EH4 5QD

Phone: +44 (131) 3362060

Email:  lauristoncastle@edinburgh.gov.uk

8. Dirleton Castle

Dirleton Castle

Adjacent to the stunning Tantallon is the atmospheric and brooding Dirleton Castle. Dating back to the 13th century when it was built,  Dirleton was a witness to much of Scottish history particularly during the Wars of Independence and Oliver Cromwell’s 1650 siege.

This magnificent ruin is located farther East from Edinburgh, and one of the most visited castles. A closer look at the imposing castle walls would tell you of the brutality this former stronghold had to suffer. Walkthrough the main gate and you can still imagine the fear and fury brought by those battles.

Spend time inside and explore what was left of the once-mighty Dirleton. Check out the massive kitchen, the pit prison, and the bedchambers. Better yet, watch out for the entertaining and knowledgeable guide that can take you through the castle’s history, with reenactments and storytelling.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Adult: £6 per ticket

Child: £3.60 per ticket

Concession: £4.80 per ticket

Contact Information

Address: 

Dirleton Castle And Gardens,
North Berwick,
East Lothian,
EH39 5ER

Phone: +44 (1620) 850330

Email:  customer@hes.scot

9. Rosslyn Castle

Rosslyn Castle

Located near Rosslyn Chapel, Rosslyn Castle was said to have been constructed around the early 1300s, after the Battle of Roslin. The castle was the ancestral domain of the prominent St. Clair family and has undergone renovation and restoration over the centuries as it either got attacked or damaged by fire. It has French architectural influences evident on its round buttresses which can still be seen today.

The castle is now under the care of Rosslyn Chapel Trust, with the only sone of its parts open to visitors. Since the mid-1980s, Rosslyn Castle has been used exclusively as a holiday accommodation available for rent.

Opening Hours

Monday to Saturday – 9:30 AM to 5:00PM

Sunday – 12:00 PM to 4:45 PM

Admission Fee

single tickets cost just £1.60, while a full day’s pass will set you back just £4.00)

Contact Information

Address:

Chapel Loan,
Roslin,
Midlothian,
EH25 9PU

Phone: 0131 440 2159

Email:  mail@rosslynchapel.com

10. Dundas Castle

Dundas Castle

Picture perfect and situated just 8 miles from Edinburgh’s city center, the Dundas Castle is now a popular events venue and holiday accommodation. Dundas’ ‘auld keep’ was built in 1416, and served both as a residence and fortress.

The imposing main house was built in 1818, adjoined to the old keep. For the last century or so, Dundas Castle is owned by the Stewart-Clark family and has been exclusively used for events or accommodation.

It sits in a 1,000-acre estate in peaceful countryside, still open for those who wish to visit except when it’s booked for a function or as a temporary residence.

Opening Hours

Monday to Friday – 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Contact Information

Address:

Edinburgh,
EH30 9SP

Phone: 0131 319 2039

Email:  enquiry@dundascastle.co.uk


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10 Best Museums In Edinburgh, Scotland

Edinburgh with its Old Town and Royal Mile, as well as a castle perched on a hill, is already an extraordinary city that’s like one huge open museum and gallery. There’s a lot of interesting and unique things to see and with the many museums spread around the city, it is but natural that a first-time visitor would devote a day or two exploring them. Here’s a list of the best museums in Edinburgh to help you figure out where to go.

10 Best Museums In Edinburgh, Scotland

1. National Museum of Scotland

National Museum of Scotland

Occupying two buildings right in the heart of Edinburgh, the National Museum of Scotland is hailed as one of UK’s top attractions. Building One introduces visitors to Scotland’s history while Building Two features archeology, industrial technology and decorative arts from other countries’ ancient periods such as that of Egypt, China, Japan, and Korea.

Aside from those on display you should also check out the museum’s stunning interiors featuring glass atriums and vaulted ceilings and the stunning views from the rooftop. Another must-see is the National Museum of Scotland are the remains of Dolly, the first cloned mammal, truly a significant part of history and modern science.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address: National Museum of Scotland Chambers Street Edinburgh EH1 1JF

Phone: 0300 123 6789. 

Email: conferences@conventionedinburgh.com

2. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Divided into buildings called Modern One and Modern Two with a sculpture park in between, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art invites more than just a few hours when you visit. There’s a lot to see in the galleries and you can even request to view the archives that tell more about the art movements and artists featured. Step into Modern One, and immerse yourself in some of the best pieces from British art masters such as Francis Bacon, Tracey Emin,  Damien Hirs and David. Modern One also has American artists like Andy Warhol, and legends Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse.

Outside, you won’t miss a spiraling mound with steps, and reflecting pools inside, also known as ‘Landform’ by Charles Jencks’. Modern Two, meanwhile, takes you through a stunning Dada and Surrealist art collection as well as works of Sir Eduardo Paolozzi.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address:  75 Belford Road, Edinburgh, EH4 3DR

Phone: +44 (0)131 624 6200

Email: enquiries@nationalgalleries.org

3. The Museum of Edinburgh

The Museum of Edinburgh

A free museum located in a charming 16th-century townhouse, the Museum of Edinburgh is a must-visit if you want to be acquainted with the city’s history and culture. The place has a maze of rooms, all containing unique items that tell a story. The eclectic mix of artifacts includes glass, silver, and pottery, as well as the collar and bowl of Greyfriar’s Bobby, the dog who guarded his human’s grave for more than a decade.

The museum also has the National Covenant of 1638, with most of its signatures written in blood, a national treasure that you must see when in the Museum of Edinburgh.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address: Lady Stairs House Lady Stair’s Close Lawnmarket | Royal MileEdinburgh EH1 2PA, Scotland

Address:  142 Canongate, Royal Mile.

Phone:+ 44 (0) 131 529 4143

4. Scottish National Gallery

Scottish National Gallery

Located in Princes Street is the Scottish National Gallery, home to an impressive collection of Old Masters and Scottish artists. As you step into the gallery, you’ll be greeted by the Renaissance piece Titian’s Venus Anadyomene, which is 500 years old. A few steps more and you’ll see Canova’s Three Graces, while the ground level contains 16th to 19th-century masterpieces.

Also in the basement are what is considered as the highlight of the national gallery – the stunning Scottish collection.  This includes ‘Reverend Robert Walker Skating on Duddingston Loch’ by Sir Henry Raeburn, as well as unique pieces from other Scottish art luminaries like Allan Ramsay and Sir David Wilkie.

Opening Hours

Monday – Wednesday – 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Thursday – 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM

Friday – Sunday – 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address: The Mound, Edinburgh, EH2 2EL

Email: enquiries@nationalgalleries.org

5. Royal Scottish Academy

Royal Scottish Academy

Linked by a walkway from the Scottish National Gallery, the impressive Royal Scottish Academy of Art and Architecture is a definite must when you go museum hopping in Edinburgh. The building in itself is a work of art, of Neoclassical influence with pale-blonde sandstone and colonnaded pillars. Located close to Princes Street, the Royal Scottish Academy of Art and Architecture is also a popular exhibition venue in the UK.

The exquisitely curated collection meanwhile boasts of pieces from the 1780s, showcasing works of featured artists even as they were just starting until they’ve attained success. The Royal Scottish Academy is also regarded as one of the premier art institutions in Scotland for the past 200 years.

Opening Hours

Monday – Saturday – 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Sunday – 12:00 PM to 5:oo PM

Admission Fee

A Registration and Handling Fee of £6.00

Contact Information

Address: The Royal Scottish Academy of Art and Architecture
The Mound, Edinburgh, EH2 2EL

Phone: 0131 225 6671

6. The Museum of Childhood

The Museum of Childhood

A one of a kind museum that houses an eclectic collection that’s sure to remind anyone of their childhood whatever era they’re from, The Museum of Childhood is a must-visit in Edinburgh.  Essentially retro heaven, this museum was founded in 1957 by Joseph Patrick Murray.

This four-story building is home to a rare collection of toys, games, clothes, teddy bears and dolls, all reflecting the year they were from. The place is family-friendly with furniture for small guests, a puppet theatre and PA system that plays children’s voices and nursery rhymes.

Opening Hours

Monday to Sunday – 10:00 AM to 5:45 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address:

42 High Street,
Royal Mile,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH1 1TG

Phone: +44 (0) 131 529 4142

7. Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

 

An extensive collection of some of the most evocative and fascinating pieces await you at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. There may be a lot to see here and a day visit might not be seen enough, make sure you look at Alexander Nasmyth’s portrait of Scotland’s national poet Robert Burns.

The vast collection of portraits and photographs also include those bearing the images of other famous Scots such as David Hume, Alex Ferguson, Tilda Swinton, and Sean Connery. Make sure you also look out for some notable modern classics such as a photo of John Lennon and Yoko Ono from 1980, by Annie Leibovitz.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address:  1 Queen Street,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH2 1JD

Phone: +44 (131) 624 6200

Email: info@nationalgalleries.org

8. Writers Museum

Writers Museum

 

The Writers Museum primarily pays tribute to Scottish literary greats Robert Burns, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Sir Walter Scott. Through guided tours and the items on display are insights about their life and work. Established by William Gray in 1622, the Writers Museum has on display a deak originally owned by Burns, kiddie rocking horses from Scott and Stevenson’s wardrobe.

Other curious items include the press that printed early editions of ‘Waverly’ by Scott, rare books, portraits, and some early drafts. It is free to explore the museum, which is located in the Royal Mile.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address: Lady Stairs Close

Phone: +44 (0) 131 529 4901

9. John Knox House

John Knox House

Dating back to 1470, the Knox house is the only Medieval building remaining in the Royal Mile area of Edinburgh. This structure is closely associated with one of the most turbulent times in Scottish history – the Reformation era. The Knoxx House is a museum that is home to portrait puzzles and a variety of other curious items each with an intriguing story behind them.

Opening Hours

Monday to Saturday – 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Admission Fee

£ 5 adult, £ 4 senior, £ 1.00 child

Contact Information

Address:

43 – 45 High Street,
Edinburgh,
Mid Lothian,
EH1 1SR

Phone: +44(131)5569579

Email: reception@scottishstorytellingcentre.com

10. The People’s Story Museum

The People’s Story Museum

A fascinating venue that showcases Edinburgh’s social history through the ages, the People’s Story Museum is a must for anyone interested in history. This is history that’s particularly focused on the life, struggles, and accomplishments the city’s working-class, as told through the intriguing artifacts on exhibit.

There is a variety of items on display, reflecting culture and history, as well as crafts and trades, covering different eras up to the 1980s. These include periods that have significantly influenced culture and history such as women’s lib, punk and even sports such as football.

Opening Hours

Monday – Sunday –  10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Admission Fee

FREE

Contact Information

Address: 163 Canongate, Royal Mile, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Phone: +44 131 529 4057

12 Things To Do in the Isle of Arran, Scotland

The Isle of Arran’s attractions are so varied and diverse you won’t be lost for things to do or places to see. The island is about 4 hours away from Edinburgh and 2.5 hours away from Glasgow so it can be a good day trip from both cities. It is sometimes called a mini Scotland because it pretty much has a lot of what the mainland has to offer, from rugged mountains, scenic forest trails, stunning waterfalls, picturesque castles, as well as one of the best long distance walking routes in the world. It even has its own holy isle, a cheese shop, and distillery. Your visit to Arran is bound to be jampacked, so here’s a list of the best things to do in the Isle of Arran, Scotland.

12 Things To Do in the Isle of Arran, Scotland

1. Goatfell

Goatfell Isle of Arran

The highest point on the Isle of Arran at 2,866 ft (874 m), Goat Fell is an incredibly prominent part of the island’s skyline, with its jagged summits and ridges. If you’re feeling adventurous and want to make the most of your stay in Arran as well as see it from one of its top attractions, then hiking up Giatfell is right for you. You can start near Brodick Castle, or take an alternative route leaving from the village of Corrie or from the north via the Cioch na h-Oighe ridge. This challenging climb rewards you with stunning scenery along the way, as well as panoramic views of the island and the sea. On a clear day, you can even see all the way to Ireland!

2. The Arran Coastal Way

arran coastal way

The Arran Coastal Way is one of the world’s best long-distance walking trails. Circling the island that covers 65 miles, the paths in this trail are well-marked. There are also sections to suit every ability. One of the best activities to do in Arran,

you could just choose small sections if you fancy a walk or tackle the full route over a week if you are feeling adventurous. You can complete the Arran Coastal Way with or without climbing Goatfell.  Along the way, you will pass through 12 villages where there are facilities, cafes, accommodation and the enchanting scenery of the island.

3. Lochranza Castle

Lochranza Castle Arran Isle

The picturesque Lochranza Castle sits on a gravel spit,  jutting out into Loch Ranza.   Originally built in the 1200s by the MacSweens, it is one of the more interesting places to see in Arran as it looks quite mysterious. It was founded at a time when the whole of the Western seaboard was being fought over and the Norsemen took ownership in parts. Ownerships changed over the centuries and the castle went through reconstructions as well. Lochranza Castle is now managed by Historic Scotland and it’s open to the public for visits. Lochranza is also one of the best castles in Scotland.

4. Glenashdale Falls

The Glenashdale Falls

The magnificent Glenashdale Falls is also known as Eas a’ Chrannaig in Gaelic. This is made up of two huge thundering waterfalls with a combined height of 45 meters. It has a cleverly situated viewing deck which juts out over the water.

One of the best things to see in Arran, you can reach Glenashdale Falls by taking the 3-mile circular route which begins just south of Ashdale Bridge in Whiting Bay. The walk offers some stunning views and also takes in the Giant’s Graves which are two Neolithic chambered cairns that are in ruins now but still fascinating.

5. Beach Hopping

Kildonan beach

A good way to relax in between exploring a locale is by enjoying some quiet time near a body of water. In Arran, there’s going to be plenty of opportunities for you to do that as it’s got a number of pristine beaches.

In the very south of the island,  looking out to Ailsa Craig, is the picture-perfect Kildonan Beach. Sannox Beach, meanwhile, is a few miles north of Brodick,  is small and pretty secluded as it’s surrounded by little sand dunes and amazing mountain vistas.  There’s also the Pirnmill Beach, a long stretch of beach in the north west of the island,  which is even more stunning at sunset.

6. Machrie Moor Stone Circles

Machrie Moor stone circle

A must visit in Arran is the incredible Machrie Moor Stone Circles. It is located in an area that boasts of more archeological wonders such as burial cairns, standing stones, hut circles, monuments, and cists. The site at Machrie Moor is thought to be at least 4500 years old, set in the western part of Arran. This place is made up of six stone circles that tells so much about the history, culture, and spirituality of the people that lived here thousands of years ago.

7. Brodick Castle

Brodick Castle

One of the most popular things to do in Arran is a visit to Brodick Castle. The castle is home to formal gardens, woodlands, waterfalls, and an adventure playground, all whilst offering spectacular views over Brodick Bay and across the Ayrshire coast.

An opulent, baronial castle in the town of Brodick, no one would guess that this grand structure had a turbulent past. It has been damaged by battles a number of times; then rebuilt, repaired and extended over the years to become the grand stately home that it is today.

The castle is presently managed by the National Trust for Scotland.

8. King’s Cave

Kings Cave arran island

Whether or not they once sheltered Robert the Bruce, the King’s Cave on Arran’s west coast still make for an impressive sight. One of the best things to do in Arran, the hike starts in the forest car park. A circular route that’s almost 3 miles long, it’ll take you 1 to 2 hours to reach the cave. The trail takes you through a nice walk in the forest, then clearing with fantastic views. It then gets steep and slightly precarious when you reach the coast where you’ll find a series of caves.  Here you’ll enjoy scenic views of the Kintyre Peninsula and Drumadoon Point.

9. St. Molios Church

St Molios Church

Also known as the ‘red church’, St. Molios is thought to be named after Molios, a hermit who lived in a cave on the Holy Isle. He was born around 570 AD and said to have a royal lineage. When he died, his body was buried at Clachan Church, while his effigy was moved to the present church in 1889.

Inside, the church has dark wood ceiling and pews, deep red alter carpet, carvings and Romanesque window arches. It’s quite a pretty church to visit and one of the more unique things to see in Arran.

10. Isle of Arran Distillery

Located in the north of the island, near Lochranza, the surrounding scenery in the Isle of Arran Distillery is stunning. One of the places to visit in Arran, the distillery is open all year round. It is the only working distillery on Arran and has been here since the 1800s, so you can expect a wealth of interesting history and trivia when you tour the facility.

The water used to create the whiskey comes from the mountains to Loch na Davie.  The whiskey is made traditionally, before being stored in oak bourbon and sherry casks. The best part? You get to sample their fine whiskey at the end of the tour.

11. The Holy Isle

The Holy Isle Arran

Situated just off the Isle of Arran is the Holy Isle, an ancient spiritual heritage site that dates back to the sixth century. One of the best things to do in Arran on weekends is enjoying some quiet time here, and you can reach the isle by taking the small ferry from Lamlash Pier which only takes 10 minutes. Once there, you’ll be greeted by a volunteer and take you on a tour while talking about the history of the island and tell you all about the retreat. The retreat offers courses in Buddism, Meditation, Yoga, and Mindfulness, taught by experts from across the world.

This sacred site is dedicated to peace and wellbeing, as well as the home of the Centre for World Peace and Health located at the north of the island.

12. Arran Creamery Cheese Shop

Located in Kilmory on the southern end of Arran is the Arran Creamery Cheese Shop. One of the top places to visit in Arran, the Creamery has been operating since 1946 and producing a variety of homegrown and handmade dairy goods. A must-try when you visit is the Arran Dunlop Cheese, which is their specialty. You can also watch the cheese-making process, guess the age of the cheese on offer and enjoy some Arran Oatcakes.


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12 Things To Do in the Isle of Arran, Scotland

13 Must-See And Best Castles in Scotland

In Scotland, there’s history, culture and magnificent structure everywhere you look. These are best represented by the many castles in Scotland; from the highlands to the lowlands, in the capital city, even perched on cliffs or surrounded by water.

Most are centuries old, some are inhabited and some are in ruins. A lot are imposing and rugged, there are those that are interestingly flamboyant and opulent. Some are fairytale-like, while others are old and foreboding.

There’s just a lot of them so it isn’t easy to pick just a handful if you’ll spend days visiting these stunning places, but here are a few suggestions on the best castles in Scotland to help you.

13 Must-See And Best Castles in Scotland

1. Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle Scotland

Stirling Castle is the childhood home of Mary Queen of Scots and known as one of the largest and most important castles in Scotland. It stands on a volcanic rock on the border between the Highlands and the Lowlands.

A powerful fortress, Stirling Castle was at the center of Scotland’s wars of independence, between 1296 and 1356. It was also the scene of William Wallace’s victory over the English at Stirling Bridge, where you can see a monumental statue of Wallace.

An easy trip from both Edinburgh and Glasgow, Stirling Castle is quite an entertaining place to visit. You’ll come across costumed characters in historic roles on the grounds. If you have kids with you, they can dress up in period costumes and play medieval instruments.

Opening Hours

The castle opens daily at 9:30 am. Closing time varies seasonally. So make sure to double check. Below are the current opening hours for winter and summer.

Summer                   Closing Time         Last entry

1 Apr – 30 Sept           6 pm                        5:15 pm

Winter                      Closing Time         Last entry

1 Oct – 31 Mar             5 pm                        4:15 pm

Admission Fee

Valid from 1 April 2019 – 31 March 2020

Category                   On-site price         Advance purchase price

Adult (16 – 59 yrs)                 £16.00             £15.00

Child (5 – 15 yrs)                     £9.60              £9.00

60 yrs+/ unemployed)       £12.80             £12.00

Contact Information

Address:  Stirling Castle, Castle Esplanade, Stirling, FK8 1EJ

Phone: +44 (0)1786 450 000

2. Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle Scotland

Perhaps the most famous (and most visited) castle in Scotland is right in the center of the capital city. A recognizable feature in the Edinburgh’s skyline, this structure towers lover the famous Royal Mile. Perched on an extinct volcano, it has been occupied by Romans, Celtic warriors, Northumbrians, and Scots.

The oldest section of the castle dates back to the 12th century, and many visitors travel here specifically to see the Crown Jewels of Scotland. The Edinburgh Castle is also home to the St Margaret’s Chapel, the oldest building in Edinburgh; Mons Meg, a massive 15th-century cannon; several military museums; the Royal Palace of the Scottish kings, and views that stretch across the city beyond the Firth of Forth.

Opening Hours

Daily from 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM

Admission Fee

Ticket type                                           Gate price          Online price

Adult (16-59yrs)                                           £19.50               £17.50

Concession (60yrs+ and unemployed)* £16.00               £14.00

Child (5-15yrs)                                             £11.50                £10.50

Contact Information

Address: Castlehill, Edinburgh EH1 2NG, UK

Phone: +44 131 225 9846

3. Dunnottar Castle

Dunnottar Castle Scotland

Dark and dramatic, perched on a cliff overlooking the northeast coast of Scotland, Dunnottar Castle is simply breathtaking. Located around 3 kilometers South of the pretty harbor town of  Stonehaven in Aberdeenshire, getting to Dunnottar Castle involves a steep hike up. But once you’re there, the medieval ruins tell captivating stories dating back to the Early Middle Ages.

Wander around and enjoy the scenery, marvel at the ocean waves lap against the steep cliffs. After exploring, walk the coastal path along the cliffs to Stonehaven, and enjoy a hearty meal at one of the harbor front pubs.

Opening Hours

Daily from 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Adult Ticket: £7

Child Price: £3

Family Ticket: £17

Group Ticket (20+): £6

Season Pass (1 Year): £18

Senior Citizen: £7

Student Ticket: £7

Contact Information

Address: Stonehaven AB39 2TL, UK

Phone:  +44 1569 766320

4. Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle scotland

Glamis Castle (pronounced glahms) is located about 70 miles northeast of Edinburgh. Built around 1400, the site’s colorful history goes back much further. The murder of King Malcolm II, and his replacement by Macbeth, in 1040, was the inspiration for Shakespeare’s play.

Glamis Castle was the childhood home of the Queen Mother and the birthplace of Princess Margaret. It is also still the family home of the Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorne. It is regarded as one of the most beautiful castles in Scotland, set amid green trees and grass. When you come to visit,  enjoy a walk in the formal gardens or take a guided tour of the historic rooms.

Opening Hours

Daily from 10:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Admission Fee

Adult                                                          £15.50

Senior (60+) / Student                          £12.00

Child (5 – 16 years old)                          £10.00

Family (2 adults + max 3 children)     £50.00

Contact Information

Address: Angus DD8 1RJ, UK

Phone: +44 1307 840393

5. Inveraray Castle

Inveraray Castle Scotland

The elaborate Inveraray Castle has been the seat of the Dukes of Argyll, chiefs of Clan Campbell since the 18th century. Located in western Scotland on the shore of Loch Fyne, this castle has a fairytale facade with an enchanting interior.  Inveraray Castle is one of the earliest examples of Gothic Revival architecture style in Scotland.

Set in a massive 60,000-acre estate, the castle has a lovely 16-acre garden. The 13th Duke of Argyll still resides in a part of the castle with his family, but it is still open to the public. Check out the tea room for a glimpse into royal life. Inveraray Castle was also one of the settings for the TV series “Downton Abbey” and fans might recognize it from the season 3 Christmas episode.

Opening Hours

Daily at 10 AM to 5 PM

Admission Fee

2019 Admission Prices

Castle & Gardens Group Rate *
Adults £12.50 £10.00
Senior Citizens £11.00 £8.80
Students (on production of student card) £11.00 £8.80
Schools £6.00
Children (under 16) £8.00 £6.40
Family Ticket (2 Adults & 2 or more children) £35.00
Chidren (under 5) Free
Gardens Only Admission £5.00
Coach/Car Park charge per vehicle (for non-Castle visitors) £3.00 **

Contact Information

Address: Inveraray PA32 8XE, UK

Phone: +44 1499 302203

6. Caerlaverock Castles

Caerlaverock Castle Scotland

Caerlaverock is regarded as among the most powerful-looking castles in the world due to its triangular shape, with imposing sandstone walls and a tower or two at each corner. A genuine Medieval stronghold, the castle was built during the mid-13th century by the Maxwell clan. Set within a nature reserve, Caerlaverock is surrounded by a wide, deep moat. Travelers who want to see it up close and explore will find it near Glencaple in Dumfries & Galloway.

Another feature of this castle is the 17th-century residence that was built for the family inside the castle walls which can still be admired for its elaborate Renaissance details.

Opening Hours

1 April to 30 September:
Daily, 9.30 am to 5.30 pm
Last entry at 5 pm

1 October to 31 March:
Daily, 10 am to 4 pm
Last entry at 3.30 pm

Admission Fee

Member/Explorer Pass holder: FREE
Adult: £6.00
Concession: £4.80
Child aged 5-15: £3.60
Child under 5: FREE

Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Concession price: this applies if you can show proof that you’re aged 60+ or unemployed.

Contact Information

Address: Caerlaverock, Dumfries DG1 4RU, UK

Phone: +44 1387 770244

7. Duart Castle

Duart Castle Scotland

Perched upon a hill overlooking the Sound of Mull, Duart Castle was part of the dowry of the bride of a Scottish chief back in the mid 14th century. Ruined in the late 18th century, it was restored in 1911. For the last 400 years, it has been the seat of the Maclean clan.

A visit to the castle not only lets you enjoy the surroundings but the structure’s interiors as well. Check out the magnificent Great Hall, State Bedroom & Dressing Room, as well as the Clan Exhibition. You can also walk through the dungeons and admire the castle’s strategic position at the end of a peninsula of the Isle of Mull.

Opening Hours

Daily from 10:30 AM to 5 PM

Admission Fee

Adult £7.50
Child (5-15yrs) £4.00
Family (2 adults + 2 children (5-15yrs)) £19.00
Seniors and students £6.50

Contact Information

Address: Isle of Mull PA64 6AP, UK

Phone: +44 1680 812309

8. Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle Scotland

This 13th-century castle in the middle of a loch is one of the most iconic in Scotland. One of the most picturesque attractions in the country, Eilean Donan looks out toward the Isle of Skye and connected to the mainland via a footbridge. Rugged and dramatic, this 13th-century fortress has become a sort of a symbol of the Western Highlands.

Eilean Donan was first built as a fortified island, then it was destroyed in a Jacobite rebellion of 1719. The castle that we see today was built between 1911 and 1932 by Lieutenant Colonel John MacRae-Gilstrap, according to surviving ground plans of earlier buildings. Often featured in television and movies, Eilean Donan offers visitors a visit to the rooms to see period furniture, artifacts, and weaponry.

Opening Hours

Every day 1st Feb – 23rd March
10.00am – 4.00pm
(Last Admission 3.00pm

24th March – 26th Oct
10.00am – 6.00pm
(Last Admission 5.00pm)

For an updated schedule, click here.

Admission Fee

Adults
£10.00 (inclusive of Audio Guide)

Concessions (Seniors Aged 60+)
£9.00 (inclusive of Audio Guide)

Family (2 Adults + 3 Children Age 5-15)
£29.00 (inclusive of Audio Guide)

Children over 5
£6.00 (inclusive of Audio guide)

Under 5s
FREE (No audio guide provided)

Contact Information

Address: Kyle of Lochalsh IV40 8DX Scotland

Phone: 01599 555202

9. Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle

Rising above lush gardens and overlooking the coast of Firth of Clyde. Culzean Castle was built in the late 18th century. It was originally an L-plan castle, but the 10th Earl of Cassilis had it rebuilt into a more dazzling country house. Today, it is a stunning example of a fairytale-like structure with turrets and battlements, stationed above the stormy seas and surrounded by gardens and forests.

Beneath the castle, visitors (especially during summer)  to the castle will discover a complex of sea caves. The Culzean Castle is also featured on the back of the 5-pound note issued by the Royal Bank of Scotland.

Opening Hours

Castle Open: 30 March to 27 October, 10.30 am – 5 pm (last entry 4:30pm).
Country Park: Open all year, daily

Admission Fee

Adults £16.50
Family £41.00
1 adult family £32.25

Contact Information

Address: Maybole KA19 8LE, UK

Phone: +44 1655 884455

10. Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle

Built in the 4th century, Cawdor Castle is one of  Scotland’s most enchanting castles. This castle is owned and occupied by members of the Cawdor family — sometimes spelled Calder in Scotland. Cawdor Castle is known for its fairy-tale edifice, its dramatic history and romantic gardens, parts of which are over 300 years old. Inside, the castle is home to a small but remarkable personal collection of art consisting of 20th-century paintings, drawings, and sculpture, as well as old furniture. The cellars, meanwhile, still has the ancient, living thorn tree around which the castle’s original tower was built.

Opening Hours

Saturday 13th April to Sunday 6th October inclusive
Open seven days a week, 10 am to 5.30pm (last admission at 5 pm)

Admission Fee

Adults – Castle, http://tramadolfeedback.com Gardens, Grounds and Nature Trails all inclusive £12.50
Concessions £11.50
Children (aged 5 to 15) £7.50
Student (with valid
student ID)
£11.50
Family Ticket (2 adults and up to 5 children aged 5 to 15) £35.00

Contact Information

Address: B9090, Cawdor, Nairn IV12 5RD, UK

Phone: +44 1667 404401

11. Floors Castle

Floors Castle

Floors Castle is the largest inhabited castle in Scotland, that sits in a 50,000-acre estate that is also farmed and hosts a successful stud. It is located in Kelso in the heart of the Scottish Borders and overlooks the River Tweed and Cheviot Hills. Built in 1721, Floors Castle is technically never a castle in the sense of a defensive stronghold. It is simply the incredibly flamboyant home of the Dukes of Roxburgh.

Floors is the largest inhabited castle in Scotland and home to the Duke and Duchess of Roxburgh and their family.

The castle has a massive art collection, antiques and known for its splendid interior. An interesting feature of the castle grounds is the holly tree that is said to mark the spot where King James II was killed in a siege in 1460. Floors Castle is a family friendly place that’s open to the public from May to October.

Opening Hours

19th April to 30th September 10.30 am to 5 pm

October (weekends only) 10.30 am to 5 pm

Admission Fee

ADULT Castle, Gardens & Grounds admission £11.50

Gardens & Grounds £6.50 Annual Pass £20.00

CHILD Castle, Gardens & Grounds admission £6.00

Gardens & Grounds £3.50 Annual Pass £10.00

FAMILY (2 adults & up to 3 children) Castle, Gardens & Grounds admission £29.00

Gardens & Grounds £16.00 Annual Pass £45.00

Contact Information

Address: Roxburghe Estates Office, Kelso TD5 7SF, UK

Phone: +44 1573 223333

12. Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle

One of the oldest continually inhabited houses in Scotland, Dunrobin Castle might remind you of Sleeping Beauty’s Castle in a Disney theme park. Resembling a French chateâu thanks to the towering conical spires, Dunrobin is the most northerly great house in Scotland. It has been around since the 14th century and has been the family seat of the Earls of Sutherland and Clan Sutherland. This French and Gothic Revival inspired house has a total of 189 rooms and perched amidst a stunning landscape above walled gardens overlooking the North Sea. Since people actually still live here, Dunrobin Castle is open to the public from April to October.

Opening Hours

April, May, & October

Daily 10.30 am – 4.30 pm
Last entry is 4.00pm

June, July, August & September

Daily 10.00 am – 5.00 pm
Last entry is 4.30pm

Admission Fee

Adults              £12.00      Senior                 £10.00

Children           £7.50        Student              £10.00

Family           £35.00 (2 Adults + up to 3 Children)

Contact Information

Address: Golspie, Sutherland, KW10 6SF, Scotland

Email: info@dunrobincastle.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0)1408 633177

13. Castle Stalker

Castle Stalker

Castle Stalker is Stalcaire in Gaelic which means Hunter or Falconer and also nicknamed C. Stalky. This centuries-old tower house sits dramatically on a small island at the mouth of Loch Laich, an inlet of Loch Linnhe, on the west coast of Scotland. It is believed to have originally been the site of a Fortalice (a small fortified building) belonging to the MacDougalls when they were Lords of Lorn and built around 1320. Its current shape though was built around the 1440s.

It is a tall, massive and simple tower, rectangular in plan, with four stories and a garret. Castle Stalker was featured in the cult classic film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. It is now privately-owned but open to visitors by booking in advance.

Opening Hours

Opening hours vary so please check their calendar here.

Admission Fee

£20 for adults

£10 for children under 16

Family Tickets available for £50 ( 2 adults and up to 3 children )

Contact Information

Address: Appin PA38 4BL, UK

Phone: +44 1631 740315

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